3.17.2011

Onomastico

In Italy, where my ancestors lived and where my dear cousins still reside, they celebrate Onomastico or Name Day.

The Italians often name their little bambinos for saints or for the saint on whose feast day they were born, but sometimes for a connection to a patron saint of the town in which they live, or a special fondness the parents may have for a particular saint.

Today, if I lived in Italy, I would be celebrating my Onomastico much like a birthday - perhaps with cake, Asti Spumante, or even a small gift.  But, of course, I do not live in Italy.  My great grandparents came from the Southern region of Calabria around 1915, and my grandma was their first daughter to be born in America.  As with the many of the turn-of-the-century immigrants, they put forth their best efforts to become American.  In doing so, much of the family tradition was lost - including the celebration of Onomastico.

From what I am learning, St. Patrick was born as Maewyn Succat to a Roman diplomat living in England until the Tribal Kings in Ireland attacked England in 400 A.D. and took Patrick to Northern Ireland.  After six years of sleeping in a mud hut and herding pigs and sheep, he ran away finding a ship that took him back to England.  He then wandered about Europe for some time discovering that the Romans had also been conquered.  He returned to England where he lived quiety, praying, and turning to God for guidance.  Feeling God was calling him back to Ireland, he eventually returned and  brought Christianity to that land.  He used the three leaf clover to explain the holy trinity of the Catholic faith to the Irish, and today the shamrock is Ireland's national flower, and the day of March 17 observes the day he died.

For me there will be no St. Patrick's Day parade, heavy drinking, or wearing green.  Nor will I be cooking my traditional corned beef and cabbage this year since my kitchen floor is being grouted.  But, thanks to my family in Crotone I now know my name day is March 17th and so I think they wish me Nome giorno felice.

It's been interesting learning the traditions of my Italian heritage.  What I am most learning, is that in Italy they celebrate often while here in America - not so much.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

MI FA PIACERE CHE TI INTERESSI ALLE NOSTRE TRADIZIONI.
LE TRADIZIONI RISPECCHIANO L'ANIMO E LA CULTURA DI UN POPOLO.
ADELE